June 27, 1978

On This Date in TWISTED-HISTORY.com! in 1978 the US launched Seasat, an experimental ocean surveillance satellite. Each day Seasat makes 14 orbits of Earth and in 36 hours is able to monitor nearly 96% of the oceanic surface. The satellite’s equipment is able to penetrate cloud cover and report measurements such as wave height, water temperature, currents, winds, icebergs, and coastal characteristics. The satellite was also programmed to directly crossover 47°9′S 126°43′W, 49°51′S 128°34′W, and 48°52.6′S 123°23.6′W in the southern Pacific Ocean, with the last being the “Nemo” point, which is the point in the ocean farthest from any land mass. The satellite for 99 days before it inexplicable failed on October 4, 1978 when it passed over 47°9′S 126°43′W.

About Joel Byers

Born in North Georgia and educated at some very fine public institutions. Real education started after graduating from college and then getting married and raising two boys. Has the ability to see the funny and absurd in most things and will always remark on it, even if it means getting the stink-eye from his victims.

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One Response to June 27, 1978

  1. Sir Walter R'lyeh says:

    I know not of this “satellite” of which you speak, but I can tell you this. There are places upon this good Earth that man is not meant to go.

    There are vast stretches of deep ocean that simply will not tolerate a ship upon its back. Judge me mad, if you must, but my words are true. I have seen the ocean swallow a ship whole and then burp as if it were a giant living thing, and not a mere force of nature.

    And beyond my own witness, I have heard tales that have made my blood turn cold and my hair turn as white as a man many times my senior.

    Heed my words and do not seek out this lost “satellite” of yours, for to do so is the road to madness and death.

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